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Three Little Engines

From Bob McKinnon comes this modern retelling of the beloved classic, Little Engine that Could, that asks young readers, “How does your journey differ from others?” It also serves as a thank you letter to all the parents, teachers, role models, and even strangers, who help to clear the storm or pull the tree trunk from their track.

Available in your favorite bookstores.

The Work of
Bob McKinnon

This website features the work of Bob McKinnon. He is a writer, designer, podcast host, children’s author and teacher. What unites all of his work is the desire to help others move up in life – just as others have helped him. Learn more about Bob and his work in the About section of this website.

Three Little Engines

I think I can, I think I can, I think I… can’t?  What’s an Engine to do when even believing in yourself won’t get you to the top of the mountain? In this modern retelling of the beloved The Little Engine That Could, The Little Blue Engine and her friends attempt to reach the town on the other side of the mountain, but they quickly realize that not every engine is on the same track, and they all face different obstacles in their journey. In Three Little Engines author Bob McKinnon asks young readers: How does your journey differ from others?

While paying homage to the beloved classic, author Bob McKinnon acknowledges that although positive thinking and confidence are important, they are not always enough to help you succeed. In many instances, success requires a helping hand. This book is a gentle introduction to the idea of socioeconomic mobility and inequality in America. Heavily inspired by his own experiences, McKinnon teaches the youngest of readers how to recognize opportunity and inequality in the American Dream, and, most importantly, how to extend a helping hand to those on different tracks of life. At its heart, Three Little Engines is a thank you letter to all the parents, teachers, role models, and even strangers, who help to clear the storm or pull the tree trunk from your track.

Three Little Engines is now a New York Times best seller!  Order your copy today from your favorite online bookseller or your local bookstore:

 

See “The life lessons of Three Little Engines” featured on CBS Sunday Morning

What is Your American Dream Score

What is Your American Dream Score?

Spend five minutes taking this quiz, and you’ll find out what factors were working in your favor and what you had to overcome to get where you are today. At the end, you’ll receive an overall score and a personalized summary of the results (and probably a big dose of pride and gratitude).

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Rich

Rules for a Knight by Ethan Hawke is a charming and wisdom filled slim book. It is written as a letter that one of his ancestors left his children before heading off to a battle from which he was unsure to return. He shares twenty values that his children should live by – if they wish to be a noble knight like himself. Within each there is a brief fable that illustrates the value in practice.

The chapter on generosity begins:

“You were born with nothing and with nothing you will pass out of this life. Be frugal and you can be generous.”

Later in the same chapter he writes:

“There are two ways of becoming rich; by accumulating vast sums or by needing very little.”

Our most common approach to becoming rich is the former, when perhaps the latter is healthier.

The origin of the word rich is derived from the Old French word meaning power. And while money and material possessions have come to be equated with power – it is not its only source.

Bill Moyers once said that while growing up in Texas he was poor in material possessions, he was rich in public goods. He was referring to the schools, libraries and roads that made a better life possible for him. They gave him the power to go on to become the press secretary for Lyndon Johnson and a legendary journalist at PBS.

Similarly it only takes a few friends to make us feel rich. Or one great love. Or the presence of our kids. Each can empower us to be better versions of ourselves.

Taking in the wonder and richness of nature can energize us and make us feel powerful. As can good health. The richness of words on a page can inspire us – providing yet another form of power.

All of the above examples are modest, readily accessible and don’t require you to spend a single cent. In other words, we need very little to feel this richness.

May this week bring you many riches.


See all posts from Moving Up Mondays blog

Monday Morning Notes

Delivered to your mailbox each Monday morning, these short notes offer an opportunity each week to reflect on who and what contributes to where we end up in life. Readers tell us it’s a great way to start their week on a positive note. See the latest note below:

Rich

Rules for a Knight by Ethan Hawke is a charming and wisdom filled slim book. It is written as a letter that one of his ancestors left his children before heading off to a battle from which he was unsure to return. He shares twenty values that his children should live by – if they wish to be a noble knight like himself. Within each there is a brief fable that illustrates the value in practice.

The chapter on generosity begins:

“You were born with nothing and with nothing you will pass out of this life. Be frugal and you can be generous.”

Later in the same chapter he writes:

“There are two ways of becoming rich; by accumulating vast sums or by needing very little.”

Our most common approach to becoming rich is the former, when perhaps the latter is healthier.

The origin of the word rich is derived from the Old French word meaning power. And while money and material possessions have come to be equated with power – it is not its only source.

Bill Moyers once said that while growing up in Texas he was poor in material possessions, he was rich in public goods. He was referring to the schools, libraries and roads that made a better life possible for him. They gave him the power to go on to become the press secretary for Lyndon Johnson and a legendary journalist at PBS.

Similarly it only takes a few friends to make us feel rich. Or one great love. Or the presence of our kids. Each can empower us to be better versions of ourselves.

Taking in the wonder and richness of nature can energize us and make us feel powerful. As can good health. The richness of words on a page can inspire us – providing yet another form of power.

All of the above examples are modest, readily accessible and don’t require you to spend a single cent. In other words, we need very little to feel this richness.

May this week bring you many riches.

Attribution with Bob McKinnon

Attribution is a podcast, where people from all walks of life, reflect on who and what has contributed to where they ended up. Our hope is after each episode, you feel a little more inspired, grateful, or supported, then when you first hit play. Check out the latest episode below:

Episode 12: How Less Leads to More w/ Leidy Klotz


Leidy Klotz is a professor of the University of Virginia who studies how we transform things from how they are to how we want them to be. He has written for The Washington Post, Fast Company, The Globe and Mail, and The Behavioral Scientist. We discussed his latest book, Subtract: The Untapped Science of Less and its many implications both on our personal happiness and as a tool for social change.


Links to learn more about: Leidy Klotz, Subtract: The Untapped Science of Less, Sustainability through Soccer